With all the methods available below to choose from, how do you decide what is best for you and your lifestyle?

The FPA 'My Contraception' Tool can help !

Take the questionnaire and see what methods are recommended to you.

Emergency Contraception

What is Emergency Contraception (The morning after pill).

There are two types of emergency contraception pill: Levonorgesterol (which should be taken within three days of unprotected sex ) and Ella One which can be taken up to five days after unprotected sex.

There is also an emergency IUD (or coil), which can be fitted up to five days (120 hours) after a risk. This is a small T-shaped flexible contraceptive device that is fitted into the womb. In certain circumstances it can be fitted beyond the five days. This type of emergency contraception is the most effective.

 

When should I take it?

If you have had sex without using contraception or if you think your contraception may have failed, you can use Emergency contraception.

It is really important you get Emergency Contraception as soon as possible after a risk, as it works best to reduce the risk of pregnancy the sooner it’s taken.

 

Who can take emergency contraception?

Emergency contraception is available to all women, including young females under 16, if they think there may be a risk of pregnancy.

 

Where can I get Emergency Contraception?

You can get Emergency Contraception from The Centre sexual health clinics in Exeter and Barnstaple. Or from our other satellite clinics on our list.

 

Where can I get Emergency Contraception if I can’t access your clinics?

  • NHS Walk-in centres and Minor Injury Units (MIUs). (Emergency contraception pills only)
  • Some Pharmacies. (Emergency contraception pills only)
  • Some Accident and Emergency departments (Emergency contraception pills only)
  • G.P.s

Some pharmacies can provide free Emergency Contraception to those aged between 13 and 24 years. Click here for a list of local pharmacies who provide this service in the Devon area. It's recommended to phone the pharmacy first to make sure the pharmacist is there.

You can also buy Emergency contraception pills from most pharmacies - it costs around £25.

If you need more information about emergency contraception, please click here.

 

Natural family planning

family-planning

For more information about natural family planning, click here.

Implant

nexplanon-implant

This is a small, flexible rod about the size of a hair clip, that is placed just under your skin in the upper arm using local anaesthetic. It lasts 3 years. For more information, click here.

IUD (Intrauterine device)

iud

This is a small plastic and copper device which is placed into the womb. It works immediately and can be used for emergency contraception. Some IUDs can last up to 10 years. They do not contain hormones. For more information, click here.

We strongly recommend that you watch the short film below, produced by Lothian Sexual Health, NHS Lothian, as it gives you all the information you need about intra-uterine methods (IUD / IUS). 

If you are interested in having either an IUD or an IUS fitted and have already discussed this method with a clinic doctor at the Centre, it would be helpful to download this form. Please read and sign it, bring it along when you attend your appointment for the fitting. If you have any questions, do not sign the form, but bring it along to your appointment and we can discuss any questions you may have.

IUS (Intrauterine System)

ius

This is a small plastic device that is put into the womb. It contains a progestogen hormone which can make the periods lighter or stop them altogether. For more information, click here.

 

We strongly recommend that you watch the short film below produced by Lothian Sexual Health, NHS Lothian, as it gives you all the information you need about intra-uterine methods (IUD / IUS). 

If you are interested in having either an IUD or an IUS fitted and have already discussed this method with a clinic doctor at the Centre, it would be helpful to download this form. Please read and sign it, bring it along when you attend your appointment for the fitting. If you have any questions, do not sign the form, but bring it along to your appointment and we can discuss any questions you may have.

Injections

injectionThese hormonal injections are given every 8 or 12 weeks. They contain a progestogen hormone and often affect the bleeding pattern with lighter or no bleeding altogether. For more information on these methods, click here.

There is now a new injection called sayana Press you can administer yourself. Click on the link above for more information, or ask at one of our clinics.

Pills

combined-contraceptive-pill

There are 2 types of contraceptive pill – the ‘combined pill’ contains two hormones, oestrogen and a progestogen which are similar to the natural hormones in your body. It is possible to control your bleeding pattern with these pills. For more information, click here.

 

progestogen-pill

The Progestogen only pill contains a progestogen hormone which is similar to natural progesterone produced in the ovaries. This pill often makes bleeding lighter and may stop it altogether. For more information, click here.

 

Contraceptive patch

contraceptive-patch

These are small beige patches 5cmx5cm which are stuck on the skin, much like nicotine patches. They contain oestrogen and a progestogen hormone like those used in the combined pill. For more information, click here.

Contraceptive vaginal rings

vaginal-ring

This is a flexible plastic ring which the user places in the vagina. It releases oestrogen and progestogen much like the combined contraceptive pill. For more information, click here.

Diaphragms and caps

diaphragme

For more information on condoms see www.fpa.org.uk/contraception-help/condoms-male-and-female
Condoms are available free from all clinics.


For diaphragms and caps, click here.

Permanent methods – male and female sterilisation.

Male and female sterilization requires a small operation. Your GP can refer you for this. For more information, click here.

male-sterilisationfemale-sterilisation

Top Questions

More FAQs